doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Mario Travaini
“I was the only midwife on the day Sedra’s mother came to MSF’s hospital in Syria,” says Amanda Godballe, a Danish midwife for MSF. “She was only six months pregnant, but the delivery had already begun. She was expecting her first children – two twin girls. There was no way to stop the delivery as it was already too far along. In our hospital we had very limited possibilities of taking care of premature babies. We had no pediatricians, incubators, or medicine to treat babies this premature. And as I was the only midwife at the hospital that day I had to do some creative thinking, especially because I knew that the children were likely to need resuscitation to stabilize them enough to be transferred to a more fully equipped hospital over the border, where treatment was possible.”
“I got my Belgian co-worker and nurse to help me in the delivery room, although she had never assisted with a delivery before. But inexperienced hands are better than no hands! At the same time I had my good Syrian colleague to help me and also an interpreter.” 
“Both children were quickly born. First Sedra – bottom first – and then her sister – also with her bottom first. They each weighed about 1,200 grams. Sedra was reasonably well stabilized with the help of an oxygen mask and an electric radiator to keep her warm. Unfortunately, her sister did not do as well. She died only 30 minutes old. Sedra was transferred to the border, in one of MSF’s ambulances, along with her mother. And there I was, in the backseat of an ambulance with a teeny tiny vulnerable human being, who had so many odds stacked against her. At the border we had to wait, and when the medics finally came I had to hand them the small bundle across the barbed wire fence, drive back to our makeshift hospital, and hope for the best.”

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Mario Travaini

“I was the only midwife on the day Sedra’s mother came to MSF’s hospital in Syria,” says Amanda Godballe, a Danish midwife for MSF. “She was only six months pregnant, but the delivery had already begun. She was expecting her first children – two twin girls. There was no way to stop the delivery as it was already too far along. In our hospital we had very limited possibilities of taking care of premature babies. We had no pediatricians, incubators, or medicine to treat babies this premature. And as I was the only midwife at the hospital that day I had to do some creative thinking, especially because I knew that the children were likely to need resuscitation to stabilize them enough to be transferred to a more fully equipped hospital over the border, where treatment was possible.”

“I got my Belgian co-worker and nurse to help me in the delivery room, although she had never assisted with a delivery before. But inexperienced hands are better than no hands! At the same time I had my good Syrian colleague to help me and also an interpreter.” 

“Both children were quickly born. First Sedra – bottom first – and then her sister – also with her bottom first. They each weighed about 1,200 grams. Sedra was reasonably well stabilized with the help of an oxygen mask and an electric radiator to keep her warm. Unfortunately, her sister did not do as well. She died only 30 minutes old. Sedra was transferred to the border, in one of MSF’s ambulances, along with her mother. And there I was, in the backseat of an ambulance with a teeny tiny vulnerable human being, who had so many odds stacked against her. At the border we had to wait, and when the medics finally came I had to hand them the small bundle across the barbed wire fence, drive back to our makeshift hospital, and hope for the best.”

@1 week ago with 235 notes
doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Samantha Reinders

September, 2010
Phumeza’s treatment regimens included a handful of pills every day and months of painful daily injections. The side effects were grueling. The injectables left Phumeza deaf. She said, “This treatment is like a dare… day in and day out you vomit, have skin problems, the list goes on.” We’re following Phumeza’s XDR-TB story every day this week.
Check back tomorrow to see what happened next.

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Samantha Reinders

September, 2010
Phumeza’s treatment regimens included a handful of pills every day and months of painful daily injections. The side effects were grueling. The injectables left Phumeza deaf. She said, “This treatment is like a dare… day in and day out you vomit, have skin problems, the list goes on.” We’re following Phumeza’s XDR-TB story every day this week.
Check back tomorrow to see what happened next.
@2 months ago with 98 notes

macabrekawaii:

rottenmeats:

lithefider:

msmorstans:

fucoid:

Spend 7 minutes of your life watching this show on gendered marketing

This is brilliant. I specifically buy razors and shaving cream marketed to men because it’s at least 30% cheaper in the US, and yet the quality is way better. 

I always found this fascinating. I find it the biggest problem with toys though, as I hate that kids would miss out exploring a certain type of play if marketing brainwashes them it is only for the other gender.  Namely boys playing with house play things / dolls, or girls playing with tools / action figures / cars.

i love the way this opened up i love that they did that thank you thank you thank you

This was fantastic

(via seayoo)

@2 months ago with 219431 notes
@2 months ago with 4581 notes
doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Laurence GeaiSonia is 21 years old. Last December, while Sonia was more than seven months pregnant, a wave of extreme violence struck Bangui, the capital of Central African Republic, obliging her to flee her neighborhood and seek refuge in the M’Poko camp. With the help of midwives, Sonia safely delivered her baby in the field hospital set up by MSF in the camp.

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Laurence Geai

Sonia is 21 years old. Last December, while Sonia was more than seven months pregnant, a wave of extreme violence struck Bangui, the capital of Central African Republic, obliging her to flee her neighborhood and seek refuge in the M’Poko camp. With the help of midwives, Sonia safely delivered her baby in the field hospital set up by MSF in the camp.

@3 months ago with 559 notes

Looking back at my posts on tumblr (not the repost posts, but my actual text posts) is really painful. And by painful, I mean really embarrassing.

@1 week ago
colchrishadfield:

Little-known space fact: the Space Station has armor to protect against micro-meteorites. A thin extra outer layer.

colchrishadfield:

Little-known space fact: the Space Station has armor to protect against micro-meteorites. A thin extra outer layer.

@2 months ago with 712 notes

Movie Recommendation

I just watched Silver Linings Playbook for the second time. I absolutely LOVE it!!

It’s a story about family, love, mental illness, community, and just overall life. But the best part is that it tells it like it is. The family is wacky and the love story isn’t a fairy tale. All the characters have their own quirks and each come with a bag load of (realistic) problems, too.

It’s just a beautiful story about finding happiness in an imperfect life.

I highly recommend it.

@2 months ago with 1 note
doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Laurence Geai 
Ann Van Haver, midwife for MSF holds a newborn she helped deliver in M’Poko camp in Central African Republic. The camp hosts around 40,000 people who have inadequate access to water, food and shelter. The rainy season is beginning and is certain to make conditions worse. Every day, MSF teams provide over 1,000 medical consultations and assist in at least 10 births.

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Laurence Geai

Ann Van Haver, midwife for MSF holds a newborn she helped deliver in M’Poko camp in Central African Republic. The camp hosts around 40,000 people who have inadequate access to water, food and shelter. The rainy season is beginning and is certain to make conditions worse. Every day, MSF teams provide over 1,000 medical consultations and assist in at least 10 births.

@3 months ago with 342 notes

How the Church Should Talk About Depression 

@3 months ago with 1 note